According to This Glue Maker Fixing Things Is As Joyful As Sex

joy_of_fix.jpg

Here’s a brilliant example of creativity. To tout the benefits of Sugru glue, the brand has created The Joy of Fix. Yes, it’s a knock off of the famed 1970′s book, The Joy of Sex. The work comes complete with diagrams on how to “enjoy the fix.”

There’s also a second poster that gets all sexual innuendo on us. The six steps on this poster include Feels good hard or soft. Sticky, but in a good way. Rub it gently. Use your imagination. No more dribbles. DO it anywhere and everywhere.

The campiagn also includes a hilarious video in which a guy get all friendly with a bunch of people while they fix things

poster-fix%402x.gif

poster-sugru%402x.gif

More:
According to This Glue Maker Fixing Things Is As Joyful As Sex

40 Brand Logos With Hidden Messages

40_brand_logos_hidden_message_small.jpg

Here’s an infographic from UK agency Oomph that details the hidden imagery and meaning in 40 big brand logos. Many, like the arrow in the FedEx logo, you may already be aware of. Some you may not.

Take a look.

40_brand_logos_hidden_messages.jpg

See the original post:
40 Brand Logos With Hidden Messages

Job-Seeking Miami Ad School Students Create Fake LinkedIn Profile of Dead Ad Guy And Tell Ad Professionals They Should Spend More Time With Their Kids

Bring_Trick-Or-Treat_Back.jpg

In the most twisted path towards getting parents to spend more time with their kids — and look for a job, three Miami Ad School New York students, Frank Garcia, Giulia Magaldi and Begona Mas created a fake LinkedIn profile for Mark Howard, a deceased CEO of a marketing firm called Fritz & Fulton.

This fake profile has spent the last few days visiting and sending notifications to the LinkedIn profiles of New York advertising professionals. These advertising types were encouraged to visit BringBackTrickOrTreat.com where they were encouraged to make sure their work doesn’t take over their life and pull them away from their children.

Of course the entire thing is just a ploy to call attention to the three students who, of course, are looking for work and who, of course, want all you New York ad types to visit their LinkedIn profiles (links conveniently provided on the BringBackTrickOrTreat site), check them out and offer them a job.

So yea. Go spend more time with your kids. And then hire these three tricksters.

Read the original post:
Job-Seeking Miami Ad School Students Create Fake LinkedIn Profile of Dead Ad Guy And Tell Ad Professionals They Should Spend More Time With Their Kids

OK, So Spearmint Rhino Strip Club Created An Online Video Ad Filled With ‘Naked’ Strippers

Naked_Girls_Take_Over_Boardroom_-_YouTube.jpg

Given the continuously sex-addled mind of the human male, you wouldn’t think a strip club would have to advertise at all. Yet they do. Apparently even horny men need motivation from time to time.

One such strip club — yes, the prefer to be called a gentleman’s club — Spearmint Rhino has decided its time to do an online ad. Well, a YouTube video that’s an ad actually.

The ad places Spearmint Rhino strippers — or actresses that play strippers — inside an office setting with all the usual antics and shenanigans. Complete with charts that — haha, we get the joke — scream “Customer smiles on the rise” and a break room that’s, well, a strip club, the semi-NSFW ad goes all out like an old school GoDaddy ad on Viagra.

Read more:
OK, So Spearmint Rhino Strip Club Created An Online Video Ad Filled With ‘Naked’ Strippers

Victoria’s Secret’s ‘Body’ Bra Line Comes In Many Sizes But You’d Never Know It From This ‘Perfect Body’ Ad Campaign

vic_sec_perf_bod.jpg

Pity the poor woman who doesn’t live up to Victoria Secret’s definition of perfection which probably hovers somewhere around 5’8″, 34C-22-34. If you don’t come close to those measurements, it appears you should should shop elsewhere.

A new campaign for the brand is touting a line of bras they call Body by Victoria. The ads carry the headline, “The Perfect Body,” along with images of, well, women with “perfect” bodies.

Certainly there’s an aspect of every advertising campaign which aims to be aspirational, motivational, uplifting in a way that, ideally, cause a person to respond, “I want to be like that. I want to be better. I’ll have what she’s having. I want to be better. Etc.” And a nice motivational kick in the ass is a good thing every once in a while.

But when woman are subjected to this onslaught of “this is how you should look” messaging from advertisers that, let’s be honest, isn’t attainable in every case, it’s a recipe for depression.

Yes, Victoria’s Secret, and many other advertisers have long sent this message. But they usually dance around things. This campaign doesn’t. The words “the perfect body” over a line up of women with perfect bodies is hardly dancing around the message.

Over in the UK, a petition posted on Change.org by 22-year-old Frances Black against the campaign has amassed over 775 signatures.

Of the campaign, Black says, “A brand like Victoria’s Secret is hugely popular in America and in the UK, and they mainly market to young women. It’s really hurtful to women’s self-esteem. I’d like them to apologize and take accountability for choosing the wrong words for the campaign. I’d like them to amend the wording and pledge not to use such harmful language in the future.”

Note that she isn’t asking Victoria’s Secret to stop selling bras that help women look more perfect. Because most people do want to do whatever they can to look/be better. But they don’t want to have soul-crushing messaging and imagery thrust in their face on a daily basis.

Black petition reads, in part, “Every day women are bombarded with advertisements aimed at making them feel insecure about their bodies, in the hope that they will spend money on products that will supposedly make them happier and more beautiful. Victoria’s Secret’s new advertisements for their range of bras Body use this tactic, and send out a damaging message by positioning the words ‘The Perfect ‘Body” across models of exactly the same, very slim body type.”

And yes, we get that the way the headline is written, The Perfect “Body,” implies they are saying Victoria’s Secret has the perfectly sized bra for your body, it’s word smithing like this that just hides the fact there is too much focus on perfection.

Read more from the original source:
Victoria’s Secret’s ‘Body’ Bra Line Comes In Many Sizes But You’d Never Know It From This ‘Perfect Body’ Ad Campaign