Tag Archives: social-media

In Case You Missed It, Poor Social Media Judgment Can Cost Jobs

This is one of those subjects that will be written about for a long time even though it feels like this should be common sense at this point but “Hey!” (as Uncle Si would say). So here is the latest study from On Device Research shows that those between the ages of 16-34 are not NOT getting the message and, more surprisingly, they may not even care.

cnet reports

Ten percent of young people said they knew they were rejected from a job because of their social media profiles, yet 66 percent of young people still don’t seem to care that these profiles may affect their career prospects. The majority of young people cater their social media presence to friends rather than potential employers, according to On Device Research.

The following chart gives some more insight on an international level. The good news for folks in the US is that fewer people seem to think they have been hurt in their job search due to social media activities.

This creates a lot of questions like “Is the idea of employers scanning social media while on the job or while in the job filling process more of a threat than a reality?”. Are people truly looking to social media like they claim they are when trying to determine what sort of person a job candidate is? Are job seekers really that insensitive to the needs of an employer that is paying them in the name of ‘being social’?

These are all online reputation concerns and questions that many are considering but one has to wonder if it is more of the “it’s written about a lot so it must be real” syndrome that plagues a lot of the Internet ‘news’ we read and pass along on a regular basis.

To that end, if employers are merely working off the implied threat of checking someone’s social media activity as part of their job screening process or even a condition of employment that could be trouble. Actually looking at someone’s social media activity can be a valuable insight into what makes a person tick, or possibly makes them a ticking time bomb.

Of course, recent decisions that involve the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and social media activity of employees have provided some legal precedent and protection for workers in certain instances even when their conduct in the social media space was not necessarily something their employers would like to be representative of their organization.

As with most issues in the Internet space there is no cookie-cutter or cut-and-dry answer. Everything is more in the gray scale rather than seen as clearly black or white. As a result there will always be plenty of opinions but strictly defined right and wrong answers may be very hard to come by both now and in the future.

What’s your take?

Originally posted here:
In Case You Missed It, Poor Social Media Judgment Can Cost Jobs

[Infographic] The State Of Social Media Marketing

State Of Social Media Marketing PreviewWe always are trying to assess the state of things in today’s society. The state of the economy. The state of the union. The state of the state. You get the picture.

Well we don’t want those of us in the social media space to be left out of the conversation.

That said, here is some light information to help ease you back into the work world after a long weekend. The following infographic is an attempt to take a snapshot of an industry that is changing as I type this introduction. It comes from Wishpond via Media Bistro. Have something to add? Let us know in the comments.

Here is the original post:
[Infographic] The State Of Social Media Marketing

Pew Study Shows Teens Are Not Shy About Posting Personal Information

We’ve been warning kids for years not to put personal identifiers on the internet. Still, a new study from Pew shows that 71% of teens have mentioned their school name on social media and 20% have posted their cell numbers.

Okay, maybe this is just the paranoid mom talking but these numbers scare me:

pew teens sharing

I’m shocked but not surprised by this chart or anything in Pew’s new study “Teens, Social Media, and Privacy.”

The entire report is more proof that 12-17 year olds are not only comfortable on social media, they’ve learned how to navigate the treacherous waters better than their parents. Look at these numbers:

pew privacy

First off, how interesting is it that the numbers flip from Facebook to Twitter. Privacy obviously isn’t a concern when Tweeting but it’s important on Facebook. I’d be bolstered by that except for the fact that these teens are hiding from the wrong people. They aren’t going private to keep from sharing personal info with a stranger, many are hiding from authority figures.

Female (age 16): “And our SRO [School Resource Officer] Officer [sic], he has information. He can see anything that we do, basically, because he’s part of the police department. And so he’s talked to my friends and I before. And he was like, anything you do, I can pull up. So if y’all tweet about a party, while you’re there, just don’t be surprised when it gets busted.”

How about friending mom or dad?

Male (age 16): “Yeah, [I’ve gotten in trouble for something I posted] with my parents. This girl posted a really, really provocative picture [on Facebook] and I called her a not very nice word [in the comments]. And I mean, I shouldn’t have called her that word, and I was being a little bit too cocky I guess, and yeah, I got in trouble with my parents.”

Male (age 17): “It sucks… Because then they [my parents] start asking me questions like why are you doing this, why are you doing that. It’s like, it’s my Facebook. If I don’t get privacy at home, at least, I think, I should get privacy on a social network.”

Even though they’re concerned about what their folks will see, 70% still said they have friended their parents. But that doesn’t mean they’re sharing everything. More than half the teens surveyed said they were confident in their ability to manage their privacy controls on Facebook. That means that mom might not be seeing half of what junior posts.

The Highs and Lows of Facebook:

Some of the teens in the survey said they have to be on Facebook if they want to be in the loop with their friends. Others mentioned how stressful it can be because you’re putting yourself out there on a regular basis.

Female (age 13): “I feel like over Facebook, people can say whatever they want to. They can message you. And on Instagram you can delete the comment really easily, and you don’t have to live with it, kind of. Whereas Facebook, if they say something mean, it hurts more. I don’t know why it does. And also [Instagram] it’s not public, so people tend to not come off so mean. Because all they really want is for people [to] like their photos.”

But there are still those who have seen the light:

Female (age 16): “I deleted it [my Facebook account] when I was 15, because I think it [Facebook] was just too much for me with all the gossip and all the cliques and how it was so important to be– have so many friends– I was just like it’s too stressful to have a Facebook, if that’s what it has to take to stay in contact with just a little people. It was just too strong, so I just deleted it. And I’ve been great ever since.”

Proving there is life without Facebook. Who knew?

Credit:
Pew Study Shows Teens Are Not Shy About Posting Personal Information

[Infographic] When Did Social Media Lose Its Way?

Social Media Infographic PreviewSocial media has had quite a ride over the past 10 years (or however many you want to apply to its lifetime if you don’t agree with 10).

As companies have discovered and embraced the process they have also managed to abuse it in the process. The practice has devolved and is now trying to get its footing as an effective Internet tool while not having to claim that it will save the world for whomever chooses to use it. The reality is that when done properly it is a very effective way to accomplish a lot for a business in areas as diverse as marketing, legal, sales, PR, HR and on down the line.

The inbound marketing software company, HubSpot, has created an interesting infographic to show this kind of life cycle development we are eluding to here. Check it out.

Social Media Infographic

There is a new addition to ever growing group of services that HubSpot is offering in its software as a service (SaaS) marketing automation software product. The following video explains that as well.

So what is it going to be for your business? Social media the way it should be or social media the way it has been?

See the original post here:
[Infographic] When Did Social Media Lose Its Way?

[Infographic] When Did Social Media Lose Its Way?

Social Media Infographic PreviewSocial media has had quite a ride over the past 10 years (or however many you want to apply to its lifetime if you don’t agree with 10).

As companies have discovered and embraced the process they have also managed to abuse it in the process. The practice has devolved and is now trying to get its footing as an effective Internet tool while not having to claim that it will save the world for whomever chooses to use it. The reality is that when done properly it is a very effective way to accomplish a lot for a business in areas as diverse as marketing, legal, sales, PR, HR and on down the line.

The inbound marketing software company, HubSpot, has created an interesting infographic to show this kind of life cycle development we are eluding to here. Check it out.

Social Media Infographic

There is a new addition to ever growing group of services that HubSpot is offering in its software as a service (SaaS) marketing automation software product. The following video explains that as well.

So what is it going to be for your business? Social media the way it should be or social media the way it has been?

More here:
[Infographic] When Did Social Media Lose Its Way?